Park Destinations

 

The Brackenridge Park Golf Course is the heart of the Alamo City Golf Trail and San Antonio’s premier golf course. Golf fans will appreciate the historic significance and tranquil beauty of the Brackenridge Park Golf Course. This 18-hole course was the first to be inducted into the Texas Golf Hall of Fame and the Texas Open Hall of Honor, having been the first site of the Texas Open Golf Tournament. This course offers a challenging front nine experience with its ancient oak and pecan trees. The green fees are $75 on weekends, $60 on weekdays and a $45 twilight fee. The course is located at 2315 Avenue B in San Antonio. Call 210-226-5612 for more information.

  • Website

    http://www.thedoseum.org/

  • Address

    2800 Broadway St, San Antonio, TX 78209

  • Phone:

    (210) 212-4453

  • Hours:
    Monday – Thursday: 10 AM – 5 PM
    Friday – Saturday: 9 AM – 6 PM
    Sunday: 12 PM – 5 PM

The DoSeum is San Antonio’s new museum for kids that is dedicated to early childhood development by sparking imagination and assisting in discovering a world of knowledge. The museum consists of exhibits and programs that encourage childhood learning, especially in the creative arts, sciences and early literacy.

History:

The San Antonio Children’s Museum was founded by a group of committed volunteers who dedicated their time into building a community space for early childhood development. In September 1995, the San Antonio Children’s Museum opened its doors.

Since its inception, the museum has been visited by millions who have explored the three floors of hands-on exhibits. Dedicated to children ages 0-10, the exhibits and programs are focused on early childhood learning, especially in the creative arts, sciences and early literacy. In 2008, the museum launched three new permanent exhibits, the H-E-B Kids’ Market, PowerBall Hall, and the Tot Spot during its process of exhibit and program renovation.

On March 29, 2015, the San Antonio Children’s Museum closed its doors.

The new children’s museum opened month later on June 6, 2015, that was compromised of a series of three, two-story exhibit halls totaling 65,000 square feet. The new museum envisions a museum set in a park with beautiful gardens and meandering paths that surround the building.

The DoSeum has much to discover and explore in its years to come.


The Brackenridge Park Golf Course is the heart of the Alamo City Golf Trail and San Antonio’s premier golf course. Located within the golf course is The First Tee, where the fundamentals and values of golf are taught and provided to the public.

History:

Founded in 2001, the First Tee is the local Chapter of an international youth development organization whose mission is to impact the lives of young people by providing educational programs that build, character, instill life-enhancing values and promote healthy life choices through the game of golf.

Settled with Brackenridge Park, The First Tee has introduced the game of golf to more than 37,000 young people. The organization has contributed to shaping the lives of young people by teaching them values like respect, courtesy and sportsmanship through the game of golf. The First Tee continues to teach the fundamentals of golf and offer programs to youth to prepare for success in all levels of school and life.


The Japanese Tea Gardens are a relaxing botanical refuge located in a former quarry in Brackenridge Park. These lush year-round gardens feature shaded walkways, stone bridges, a 60-foot waterfall, ponds with multi-colored koi, and a grand exhibition of vegetation ranging from tropical plants to floral landscapes. The Japanese Tea Gardens are free to the public and are open 7 days a week from 8 AM until dusk. The Jingu House Restaurant features tea and sandwiches as well as Japanese specialties from 9 AM until 4 PM Tuesday through Sunday.  Call 210-821-3120 for additional information or click here for more information.​

History:

Once a quarry used in the 1800s for limestone and supplying the construction market, the garden has much evolved since its beginning. Around 1917, City Parks Commissioner, Ray Lambert, visualizes an oriental-style garden in the pit of the quarry. Work on the Japanese Tea Garden began in 1918 by Lambert and his engineer.

In 1919, a local Japanese-American artist, Kimi Eizo Jingu, moved to garden. He and others opened the Bamboo Room in 1926, where lunches and tea were sold. Kimi and Miyoshi Jingu maintained and lived in the garden. Unfortunately, Kimi’s family was evicted in 1941 several years after his death due to the rise of anti-Japanese sentiment of World War II.

The garden was renamed the Chinese Tea Garden, to prevent razing and vandalism during WWII. In 1984, under the direction of Mayor Henry Cisneros, San Antonio restored the original “Japanese Tea Garden” designation in a ceremony that was attended by Jingu’s children and representatives of the Japanese government.

  • Website

    http://www.kiddiepark.com/

  • Address

    3015 Broadway St, San Antonio, TX 78209

  • Phone:

    (210) 824-4351

  • Hours:
    Friday – Sunday: 10 AM – 7 PM

One of San Antonio’s most treasured landmarks is none other than the Kiddie Park located at 3015 Broadway. The park is the oldest children’s amusement park in the country! The Kiddie Park is the perfect way for adults and children to feel nostalgic of old fashioned fun.

History:

Established in 1925, the Kiddie Park is the oldest children’s amusement park in the country. The park features an original 1918 carousel and various nostalgic rides and games.

Renovated in 2009 and modern updates have left the Kiddie Park in tip top shape for all who visit. The park has preserved its 1920s style by maintaining all of the originally rides. With an old-fashioned ferris wheel, famous hand-carved Herschell Spillman carousel, and other classic children’s rides have made the Kiddie Park an iconic San Antonio attraction for over 90 years.


The Lambert Beach and Martinez Ball Fields in Brackenridge Park are the perfect way your family and friends to get together for a game of baseball, softball or kickball. The fields are open for public enjoyment.

  • Website

    http://bit.ly/1MjfOlO

  • Address

    2809 Broadway St, San Antonio, TX 78209

  • Phone:

    (210) 207-7275

  • Hours:
    Monday – Wednesday: 7:30 AM – 9 PM
    Thursday: 7:30 AM – 10 PM
    Friday: 7:30 AM – 7 PM

Lion’s Field is a multipurpose Adult and Senior Citizen Center located within Brackenridge Park that offers a variety of classes and programs. Classes at Lion’s Field include arts, dance, fitness, martial arts, music, sports, pool activities and much more! The center is available to the public for reservations of groups no more than 25 on weekends.

History:

The property that the Lion’s Club calls home was once a pasture for George W. Brackenridge’s collection of animals, which is now known as the San Antonio Zoo and Brackenridge Park. The land that club now sits on remained undeveloped until 1923 when the Lion’s Club of San Antonio, the largest in the world, selected the site for a supervised playground to be built as gift to the city. The club pledged $10,000 to construct the playground as well as committing to build a clubhouse fully equipped with restrooms, showers, lockers and an auditorium.

Opened on October 1, 2925, the playground was praised as “one of the best in the United States.” Over 10,000 people attended the grand opening including over 1,000 children who took part in a giant game of tag. Lion’s Field has remained an active recreation center since its opening. For the more than 70 years, the center has geared its operations for Senior Citizens and continues to do so.

  • Website

    http://www.sabot.org/

  • Address

    555 Funston Pl, San Antonio, TX 78209

  • Phone:

    (210) 207-3250

  • Hours:
    Monday – Sunday: 9 AM – 5 PM

The San Antonio Botanical Garden located within Brackenridge Park, consists of the Lucille Halsell Conservatory, formal and display gardens, native garden, an overlook tower and the Sullivan Carriage House. The garden is open to the public to inspire and educate the importance of plants.

History:

In the mid-1900s Mrs. R. R. Witt and Mrs. Joseph Murphy, who organized the San Antonio Garden Center, developed a master plan for a city botanical center. The pair set their eyes on a former limestone quarry and waterworks area owned by the city as the location of their new project.

Voters approved $265,000 in bonds in 1970, which was the catalyst for funding the garden proposed by Witt and Murphy. On July 21, 1976, ground broke for the new facilities and continued production until May 3, 1980 when the garden opened to the public.

Since opening, the garden has installed major additions including the Lucille Halsell Conservatory and moving the Sullivan Carriage House to the botanical garden brick by brick. The mission of the San Antonio Botanical Garden has continued to inspire people to connect with the world of plants, and understand the importance of plants in our lives.


A great way to view all that Brackenridge Park has to offer is to take a ride on the Brackenridge Eagle miniature train. This open-air train will take you on a three and a half mile trip around the park and give you a great overall look at the splendid views and facilities. The Brackenridge Eagle is operated by the San Antonio Zoo and information about hours and fares can be found at their website. A San Antonio monument in some sorts is none other the San Antonio Eagle, formerly known as the Brackenridge Park Eagle. The train has chugged along the tracks along the banks of the San Antonio River since 1956 making stops at the San Antonio Zoo, Witte Museum, Kiddie Park and the Japanese Tea Garden. The train is a local favorite and host many passengers on a daily basis on its journey through Brackenridge Park.

History:

Since 1956, the San Antonio Eagle, once the Brackenridge Park Eagle, has traveled the railroad along the scenic path of Brackenridge Park. The train was once known as the longest miniature railroad in the world. The first train was a 1/5-scale model of the diesel-type passenger train developed by General Motors.

In 2001, the San Antonio Zoo took over management of the train after signing a 23 year lease with the City of San Antonio. It was then renamed the San Antonio Eagle. A third train was purchased in 2005 by the Zoo and named the Lukey J.

Today, the train continues to chug along the same railroad that it began on in 1956, making frequent stops at the San Antonio Zoo, Witte Museum, and the Japanese Tea Garden.

  • Website

    http://www.sanantoniopetsalive.org/

  • Address

    210 Tuleta Dr, San Antonio, TX 78212

  • Phone:

    210-370-7612

  • Hours:
    Monday – Friday: 11 AM – 7 PM
    Saturday – Sunday: 11 AM – 6 PM

Located in Brackenridge Park, San Antonio Pets Alive is a no-kill animal shelter. The shelter offers core programs including Neonatal Kitten Nursery, Parvo Ward, Ringworm Ward, Medical Clinic, Foster and Adoption and PASS (Positive Alternatives to Shelter Surrender). San Antonio Pets Alive is dedicated to finding forever home for all of their rescues.

History:

Opened in 2012, San Antonio Pets Alive is a 501©(3) nonprofit organization created specifically to work in partnership with San Antonio Animal Care Services to reduce the number of adoptable animals euthanized in San Antonio.

The organization provides programs that target at-risk shelter populations, such as neo-natal kittens and puppies, pets with treatable medical issues, and animals with behavior challenges.

To learn more about SAPA! visit their website on how to donate, foster, volunteer or adopt.

  • Website

    http://www.sazoo.org/

  • Address

    3903 N St Mary's St, San Antonio, TX 78212

  • Phone:

    (210) 734-7184

  • Hours:

    Daily Hours:
    11/27/15 - 1/3/16 : 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Zoo Lights:
    11/27/15 - 1/3/16 : 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM 


San Antonio is proud to be home to the San Antonio Zoo, a major family destination and the third largest animal collection in North America. Located in the northwest corner of Brackenridge Park, the Zoo is a popular and convenient destination for park visitors and tourists. Call 210-734-7184 or email zoodev2@sazoo-aq.org for more information

The San Antonio Zoo isn’t the only opportunity for park visitors to interact with animals and wildlife. The park itself attracts a large variety of native wildlife (including birds and ducks) and is an excellent destination for bird watching and wildlife observation, particularly along the San Antonio River at Avenue A.

History

In 1914, Colonel George W. Brackenridge, one of San Antonio’s leading citizens and founder of the San Antonio Express-News, placed bears, lions, deer, monkeys, elk and buffalo on land that is now known as Brackenridge Park. The property, home to Brackenridge’s animals, became the San Antonio Zoo.

Since its inception, the Zoo has continued to evolve through the volunteer leaders who have provided generous financial support and encouraging innovation. In November 1929, two new unprecedented exhibits opened to the public—the Bear Terraces and the Primate Paradise—becoming two of the first cageless exhibits in America. The San Antonio Zoo opened yet another unique exhibit, the Richard Friedrich Aquarium, in 1948. The new expo was described as “the world’s greatest” by local press. Another addition, the Hixon Bird House, opened in 1966, featured a simulated tropical rain forest and free-flying birds. The bird collection at the San Antonio Zoo is now one of the world’s largest.

For over 100 years, the collective efforts of dedicated volunteers and individuals the Zoo has become one of the best in the nation. With more than 1,000,000 visitors annually, the San Antonio Zoo is dedicated to offering the greatest experience possible. 

  • Website

    http://bit.ly/1PaYK87

  • Address

    3875 N St Mary's St, San Antonio, TX 78212

  • Phone:

    (210) 207-3050

  • Hours:
    Monday – Friday: 9 AM – 5 PM

The historic Sunken Gardens Theater is a natural amphitheater with a classical proscenium stage adjacent to the Japanese Tea Gardens in Brackenridge Park. The Sunken Garden Theater was completed in 1937 as a part of the city’s Texas Centennial celebration and remains in use today as a performance and festival venue. Sunken Garden Theater has been a local favorite for concerts and events since its opening. The theater has hosted countless events including Taste of New Orleans and the Margarita Pour-Off, as well as staging concerts featuring Carlos Santana and many other well-known acts.

History:

From the middle 19th to early 20th centuries the City of San Antonio leased its hard rock quarry in Brackenridge Park to Alamo Cement Company until the company moved locations leaving the property abandoned. In 1915, Parks Commissioner, Ray Lambert, transformed the City’s old quarry into a civic attraction in what would become known as “the Sunken Garden.”

The natural acoustic features of the quarry drew local performers to the site. Mrs. Eli Hertzberg urged that the area be considered outdoor musical and other events. Hertzberg suggested that the theater be named the Tobin Memorial Amphitheater to honor San Antonio Mayor John W. Tobin. She also estimated that an outdoor amphitheater at the location house 50,000 to 60,000 people.

Scultptor Gutzon Borglum, now famous for his design of Mount Rushmore, drew the first plans for the theater that he claimed would “present a Grecian style of architecture.” Details of Borglum’s design differed from the final design that was completed by local architect Harvey P. Smith. Construction of the theater was authorized to begin in February 1930 and completed on July 14 of the same year.

City records refer to the theater prior to its completion as the Open Air Theater, however the dedication program called it the Sunken Garden Theater. The theater was proclaimed as a “beautiful theater that we have longed for which we have talked about for so long” by the San Antonio Civic Opera Company.

The Sunken Garden Theater as it appears today was completed in 1937 as part of the Texas Centennial celebration. Renovations to the theater including dressing rooms, stage improvements, and a concrete floor for the theater seating area.

Today, the Sunken Garden Theater continues to be city favorite venue for musical performances and events.


Located in Brackenridge Park, the Texas Golf Hall of Fame features artifacts, vintage photographs, memorabilia and the Texas Golf Walk and Hall of Game.


The Lambert Beach and Martinez Ball Fields in Brackenridge Park are the perfect way your family and friends to get together for a game of baseball, softball or kickball. The fields are open for public enjoyment.


Founded in 1901, the Tuesday Musical Club is dedicated to the promotion, study and performance of music as a fine art. The club invites the public to join one of their three community outreach programs: Artist Series, Young Artist Competition and Junior Tuesday Musical Club.

History:

Founded in 1901, the Tuesday Musical Club holds the distinction of being the oldest music club for women in Texas. Established by Mrs. Eli Hertzberg, a graduate of the New York Conservatory of Music, who found herself in the frontier town San Antonio far from the cultured arts of New York City where she once called home.

Beginning with only six members who regularly meet at Mrs. Hertzberg’s home to discuss and perform music together grew to fifteen in 1902. All members of the club were required to audition to gain entry into the club.

In 1903, the Tuesday Auxiliary Chorus, the choral group of the club was formed. Come 1904, Mrs. Hertzberg began the San Antonio Symphony Society, which remained active until WWI. A String Octet came alive in 1915, by the sister of Mrs. Hertzberg, Mrs. Edward Sachs. A duo piano ensemble began in 1916. The first of annual concert series, Musical Teas, opened on October 23, 1923 beginning what is known as the Artist Series. The Junior Club of Tuesday Musical Club formed in 1924. The Young Artists Competition formed in 1956 and continues to be held each spring for serious students of music who reside or study in Texas. 

After thirty years of meetings and member growth, the Tuesday Musical Club bought the house next door to the Hertzberg home on Euclid Avenue and named it the Hertzberg Hall of Music. A clubhouse for the club was built in 1949 on land that was leased from the city in Brackenridge Park where it still stands today.

Today, the Tuesday Musical Club continues to flourish with more than 250 members and auditions no longer a prerequisite. The club brings its members, friends and the public together to enjoy quality music.

  • Website

    http://www.uiw.edu/

  • Address

    4301 Broadway St, San Antonio, TX 78209

  • Phone:

    (210) 829-6000


One of the leading universities in Texas, UIW strives to educate men and women who will become concerned and enlightened citizens with values developed in a Judeo-Christian tradition. With an enrollment of over 9,000 students, Incarnate Word is the largest Catholic university in Texas and the fourth largest private university in the state.

History:

Founded in 1881 by the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, the university’s main campus is located on 154 acres. In 1900, the Academy of the Incarnate Word, which had been established the Government Hill area of San Antonio, moved to the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word in Alamo Heights. In 1909, college classes were added to the curriculum and the institution was renamed as the College and Academy of the Incarnate Word.

In 1998, the University was re-accredited both at the baccalaureate and master degree level and approval was given to offer doctoral degrees by the Southern Association of College and Schools Commission on Colleges. Through its College of Professional Studies, UIW is nationally accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs to offer degrees in Business Administration and the Master of Business Administration. University of Incarnate Word holds other accreditations including the American Music Therapy Association, the Texas Education Agency, the Commission of Collegiate Nursing Education and more!

The university is consists of the Rosenberg School of Optometry, The Felk School of Pharmacy, The AT&T Math, Science & Engineering Center, The Dreeben School of Education, The H-E-B School of Business & Administration, The Faye Miller Nursing & Health Professions School, The School of Physical Therapy, The Schools of Interactive Media & Design, The School of Graduate Studies and Research, The School of Extended Studies & ADCAP, The School of UIW Online and the College of Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences.

  • Website

    http://www.wittemuseum.org/

  • Address

    3801 Broadway St, San Antonio, TX 78209

  • Phone:

    (210) 357-1900

  • Hours:
    Monday – Saturday: 10 AM – 5 PM
    Sunday: 12 PM – 5 PM

The Witte Museum promotes lifelong learning through innovative exhibitions, programs, and collections in natural history, science and South Texas heritage. Settled within Brackenridge Park, on the banks of the San Antonio River, the Witte Museum features historic artifacts and photographs, Texas art, textiles, the world-renowned Hertzberg Circus collection, dinosaur bones, cave drawings, Texas wildlife dioramas and the four-story H-E-B Science Treehouse; in addition to nationally acclaimed traveling exhibits.

History:

In 1923, botanist and high school teacher, Ellen Schultz, began her goal of starting a museum for the growing city of San Antonio by fundraising to acquire the H.P. Attwater natural history collection. Schultz and other local citizens including Lena McAllister, Ethel Drought and Mayor John Tobin established the San Antonio Museum Association. Schultz organized schoolchildren to raise funds to acquire her much desired Attwater Collection by having the children sell bluebonnets and cakes as well as engaging in historical performances of Los Pastores. Schultz and her peers ultimately raised enough funds to purchase and install the Attwater Collection.

On September 25, 1925, San Antonio businessman Alfred W. Witte left $65,000 to fund a museum in Brackenridge Park after his death. The gift from Witte was unexpected and members of the San Antonio Museum Association went to work with Mayor Tobin and Architect Robert Ayers on the new museum named for Witte’s parents. The site chosen for the new museum was none other than the location of the original Spanish Acequia Madre de Valero. The Witte Museum opened to the public with a huge community celebration just over a year later on October 8, 1926.

Today, the Witte Museum has hosted numerous traveling exhibits and created many of their own since its opening. Many historical artifacts and information have been preserved at the museum throughout the years. New additions to museum have been installed like that of the H-E-B Science Treehouse to educate visitors of the Witte.